Week 4 – Framing your Subject

The fourth Challenge in my 52 Week Landscape Composition Photo Challenge is Framing your Subject. Framing your subject is one of those compositional techniques that can work wonders or completely ruin photos. This is a compositional technique that I have struggled with a lot and to be honest, still struggle with a lot.

I want things to fall naturally within a scene and feel like it’s forced or manipulated. For some reason, Framing your Subject feels to me like forcing things. In some cases, it works really well but the key is to figure out when it works and when it just distracts more than it adds.

So, one of the things I have started doing is to constantly question whether I am putting in my frame is something that adds or distracts from the main story. Sometimes, many of the compositional techniques that have been tried, tested, and proved before, it may not always work. Framing your subject is one of those things that can just add clutter to a shot and make it feel very cramped. What you think adds a natural frame can actually be seen as distracting elements by others. As Mr. Adams famously said, ‘there are always two people in every picture: The Photographer and the Viewer.”

Based on what I have seen, framing can be just about anything from shooting through a window, tunnel, arches, doorways, branches; they can be natural elements, architectural elements, or anything in between. I have seen some very creative ways other Photographer’s have used frames. I have tried to learn as much as possible but what I realize is that there is a long way to go.

Here’s a photo that I took during one of my trips to Yosemite. I did not think about this framing. I have seen this before and drew inspiration from the composition. I think this is a good example of framing your subject. But to me, it does feel a bit forced.

Over the course of the last few weeks, I have been looking for a good subject that is a good example of framing your subject. Maybe that’s the problem. I shouldn’t be looking for a subject to force a compositional technique. If the scene naturally calls for a comp technique, that’s what will add to the photo and not feel forced.

Over the course of the last few weeks, I have been looking for a good subject that is a good example of framing your subject. Maybe that’s the problem. I shouldn’t be looking for a subject to force a compositional technique. If the scene naturally calls for a comp technique, that’s what will add to the photo and not feel forced.

 

I went to Shark Fin Cove for Sunrise recently and I knew there was an arch there. I wanted to see if I can use the Arch and shoot the Shark Fin using the Arch as a frame. I realized that wasn’t possible because of the angle. I was able to frame this other seas stack perfectly within the frame. Does it look forced? Maybe! But this is the best example of framing your subject. At least, for now. I may be able to find a better subject and scene, If I do, I’ll update this post. But until then, this is my pick for the 4th challenge of my 52 week Landscape Photo Challenge.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s